Benecig Killer 260W Mechanical Mod Review

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Benecig Killer 260W Mechanical Mod

Benecig Killer 260W Mechanical Mod Introduction:

Hello dear vapers. Anthony Vapes here again with another review. Today we will talk about the Benecig Killer 260w Mech Mod, the latest mod from Benecig. I’ve never even heard of them but we haven’t seen many VV mods come out in the past year if any so I figured it was worth the review for people looking for a VV mod to see if it’s good or not.

The Killer is a dual 18650 VV (variable Voltage) mod rated at 260 watts you adjust with a pot (potentiometer) on the front.  It’s available in 4 colors Silver, Black, Gunmetal and Rose Gold. All colors have carbon fiber inlays and a black battery door.

Benecig Killer 260W Mechanical ModBenecig Killer 260W Specs:

  • Dimensions: 65mm by 55mm by 25mm
  • Dual High-Amp 18650 Battery – Not Included
  • Maximum Wattage Output: 260W
  • Maximum Output Current: 35A
  • Voltage Output Range: 1.0-8.0V
  • 0.02 Seconds Insta-Firing Speed
  • Potentiometer-Controlled Adjustment
  • Durable Zinc Alloy Construction
  • Beautiful Carbon Fiber Inlays
  • Oversized Firing Button
  • Screenless Design – Efficient Battery Use
  • LED Light Up Functionality
  • Bottom-Loaded Hinged Battery Door
  • Over Heat Protection
  • Short Circuit Protection
  • Low Voltage Protection
  • Over Heat Protection
  • Overcurrent Protection
  • Stainless Steel 510 Connection
  • Available in Black, Gunmetal, Silver, Rose Gold

Included in Box:

  • 1 Killer 260W Mechanical Mod
  • 1 Instructional Manual

Initial Impressions on Benecig Killer 260W Mechanical Mod

When I first got this Mod, I was pretty impressed. It’s been a while since a new VV mod has come out. Early in 2017 we seen quite a few. Their was the Dovpo M VV which was excellent. There was also the Tesla Invader 3, Tesla Invader ⅔Ijoy Zenith, and Smoant Charon 218 adjustable.

Seemed to be a growing trend that has sadly died down as they are nice simple mods. Outside of this one the only other one I can think of for 2018 is a new one coming from Ijoy. Back to the mod itself it’s a nice looking mod with a massive fire button I consider to basically be a fire bar with the pod built into it.

Benecig Killer 260W Mechanical ModIt’s got a nice design and some carbon fiber inlays for flair as well as 2 LED bars one on each side of the mod that serve a purpose of more than just flair. Outside of that just a simple pot to adjust. Overall I really liked this mod form the start.

Benecig Killer 260W Performance:

Now let’s get into some data. I ran my normal testing. I used Sony VTC5A batteries for the testing. Testing resistances were done at .11, .14, .2, and .61 ohms. Also please note since it’s a pot and not a digital screen I did my best to line up the 2, 3 and 4 the same every time but could be slight variances.

The 1 and 5 settings are easy as it’s all the way in one direction. It’s made to give a basic guide as to what to expect at each setting as well as test the max and minimum output which is important on these mods.

With a .11 ohm build I got 232 watts and 46 amps max. Very good max amps as the average for a dual mod is around 40. The top ones I get are around 45-46 so it’s right there with the best of them. It was 5.049 max volts. The minimum I got was 2.314V and 49 watts so very good voltage range.

With a .14 build I got max watts of 248 so very close to the 260W listed. The voltage range was 5.891 to 2.735 and the wattage range 53 to 248 so very good.

With a .2 ohm build I got max 199 watts and the voltage range was 2.525 to 6.311 and wattage range of 32 to 199 so very good again.

With a .61 I got a voltage range of 7.679 to 2.63 and a wattage range of 11 to 97. Very good once again.

They don’t list any max specs other then the watts which was a pretty fair rating as well. Not quite 260 but 248 is very close and good and hard to complain about with a dual battery mod.

Benecig Killer 260W Mechanical ModThe amp limit is one of the best and no boost circuit but good volt limit as well. Right in line with mod regulated mods max outputs. They do have a chart in the manual (pictured in the album) that tells you approx wattage at different resistances and it’s pretty accurate and right in line with my testing so very well done there and should be helpful to people trying to figure out what setting to use.

The main thing to look at with these mods is the minimum voltage and the voltage range. The issue I’ve had with some is the minimum output is as high as 3.4 to 3.6 volts meaning with a .1 the minimum output is 115-129 watts which is quite high.

Thankfully not an issue here as with a .11 I was able to go as low as 49 watts. In my testing the minimums depending on resistance (high resistance means lower minimum wattage) between 11 and 49 watts so very good. Minimum voltage is between 2.314 and 2.735 in my testing so I’d say the range is 2.4-7.7 for rounding. Very good range.

Overall, I felt the performance of this mod was really good. It didn’t really struggle with the .11  ohm build which was surprising I was able to get 232 watts at that resistance. I was able to get 248 watts max overall, so I consider it to be accurately rated at 260 watts. It’s close enough and does over 200 and could have maybe gotten a little more had I tested a .17 ohm build.

The 7.679 volt limit shows there is no boost circuit. Their manual does not list a volt or amp limit. The most amps I got was 46 with a .11 ohm coil which is way above average for a dual battery 18650 mod and one of the highest out there I’ve tested.

Benecig Killer 260W Mechanical ModThe mod never got warm when stressing it at 150 or less watts however over 150 it does take on a lot of heat from the atomizer. Not unsafe hot but more than I would feel comfortable with using all the time. Still I don’t recommend vaping over 150 watts on a dual battery mod and make sure to always use 20A CDR batteries or higher. For people’s normal vaping habits and the safe limits the mod won’t run hot.

Benecig Killer 260W Mechanical Mod Details and Usage

The mod uses a standard 5 click to turn on and off. It’s a VV mod so there is no menu or modes. It’s just a fire button and a pot to adjust voltage. You just turn the pot counter-clockwise to lower output and clockwise to increase output.

The Pot is nice and easy to adjust which is great. Some mods need a fingernail or flat-head screwdriver it seems but not this one. Easy to grip and turn it. There is no screen or other buttons on it and no TC mode. The mod itself is built solid with some really minor rattle of the fire button that’s hardly noticeable, and has a good weight. Feels solid but not heavy. The battery door is a standard bottom loading battery door. It’s easy to open and close and really well done.

The paint looks nice and doesn’t scratch off, and I have no visible wear on mine even on the the bottom. I love the coloring on the gunmetal one with the carbon fiber inlays but form the pics would have really loved a rose gold one as it stands out quite a bit. The fire button is nice and clicky and a huge.

It’s a giant rectangle with 2 bumps on it and the pot is built into it. It works well and It never gets stuck or anything though which is as it should be and personally it’s so large I consider it a fire bar as you can just squeeze the mod to fire.

Benecig Killer 260W Mechanical Mod The 510 pin gave me no issues and every atomizer I used on it worked great with no gaps. It’s secured in from the outside with 2 screws and looks really nice. The mod handles 24mm atomizer flush. Anything bigger will overhang. 25mm have very slight overhang due to beveled edges.

I wish they would have left the edges flat for no overhang on 25mm atomizers as many new ones are 25mm. The 510 is off-center and more towards the front of the mod. Also for branding the mod itself is pretty nice overall and not heavily branded.

There is a small benecig engraved in the top and a good size “killer” logo engraved in the back. Not to bad and doesn’t stick out much at all. There is no USB port or internal charging on this mod but not a big deal since I don’t recommend charging internally in your mods anyway.

The LED on the mod acts as a battery meter as well so is function but not programmable. Blue means battery is more than 50%, purple means 31-50%, and red means 30% or less. Good job there overall. The LED is only active when firing. It also has all the protections you want like over puff, reverse polarity, low voltage, atomizer short, too hot, and over current.

The LED will flash white when a protection kicks in. For instance firing without an atomizer will flash white. The mod is listed to fire down to .05 ohms as well. I didn’t test it because no need to go that low but could be helpful for those times your builds wind up around .09 or so.

Benecig Killer 260W Mechanical Mod Video Review

Benecig Killer 260W Mechanical Mod Pros & Cons 

Pros:

  • Build Quality of mod
  • Good Color Options
  • Performance
  • Good Voltage Range
  • Accurately rated for watts
  • excellent amp limit
  • simple easy to use
  • batteries are easy to get in and out without damaging wraps
  • Manual is helpful in figuring out your wattage
  • excellent massive fire button that is like a fire bar
  • good 510 pin
  • LED acts as battery meter
  • Pot is easy to adjust

Cons:

  • 25mm atomizers have slight overhang due to beveled edges
  • They call it a mech mod when it’s not a mech mod
  • very minor button rattle

Conclusion:

So with all that said, do I recommend Benecig Killer 260W Mechanical Mod or not? I don’t like to do a hard yes or no but this one easily leans pretty heavy towards the yes. It’s been a long time since we had a good VV mod hit the market and this one was much needed and performed great. Ticks all the boxes for this style of mod. Pretty accurately rated and a helpful manual. Very well done from a pretty new company and their 2nd mod overall.

Anthony Vapes

I started vaping in late 2011 to quit chewing tobacco. over the past few years i got a lot more into the hobby side and buying and collecting a lot of gear. Fed up with the lack of good fair reviews i decided to start doing reviews late 2016 and haven’t looked back. I enjoy providing people with technical reviews that are fair and unbiased and from a place of knowledge to help them spend their money wisely.